Hacker’s Guide to Installing OpenShift Container Platform 3.9

Hacker’s Guide to Installing OpenShift Container Platform 3.9

  Background My problem, like most technologists, is that I only have a slice of my time to dedicate toward acquiring and maintaining knowledge about any given technology, product, project, tool, platform, etc. Split that with the fact that almost every CIO is preaching that we, as technologists, need to be closer to the business,

Kubernetes is a 10 Ton Dump Truck That Handles Pretty Well at 200 MPH

Kubernetes is a 10 Ton Dump Truck That Handles Pretty Well at 200 MPH

Recently, I read another article that critiqued Kubernetes as having a steep learning curve. At conferences, I also hear a lot of people in the Kubernetes community talk about how we need to make it more easy to onboard people. While I think it’s a noble goal to make Kubernetes more usable, I don’t think

Building an OpenShift Lab: Why I Used Atomic Host

Building an OpenShift Lab: Why I Used Atomic Host

RHEL Atomic Host requires a lot less configuration than a full RHEL Server installation. The docker daemon is installed and configured, storage is already setup to use device mapper on a dedicated LV, and the default tools necessary to install OpenShift are already installed. And as a bonus, the installation on my laptop in KVM virtual machines is about 10X as fast as installing a full RHEL installation.

Core Builds in the Age of Service

Core Builds in the Age of Service

Background As legacy applications are redesigned for the cloud, they are converted to run in a stateless manner. In newly designed applications, data flows between application code, messaging infrastructure, caches and databases seamlessly even during individual node failures of any one subsystem. When an active node fails, a new one is instantiated and placed back